Social Media: The Ethics of Fake News Discussed During Panel Discussion at WMU-Cooley Law School

Martha Moore, Emily Lawler, Meegan Holland, John Lindstrom

Pictured from left to right: WMU-Cooley Professor and Auxiliary Dean Martha Moore; M-Live Capitol reporter Emily Lawler; Veterans Affairs Agency senior policy adviser Meegan Holland and publisher of Gongwer News Service John Lindstrom.

As “fake news” and social media have been a heightened topic of discussion recently among the public and national daily news, WMU-Cooley Law School and the Michigan Capital Chapter, American Society for Public Administration hosted the panel discussion, “Social Media: The Ethics of Fake News,” on March 22.

WMU-Cooley President and Dean Don LeDuc presented opening remarks for the panel discussion and introduced Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency senior policy adviser Meegan Holland, who moderated the conversation. Panelists included Martha Moore, WMU-Cooley professor and auxiliary dean; Emily Lawler, M-Live Capitol reporter; and John Lindstrom, publisher of Gongwer News Service. Moore kicked off the discussion with comments about truth and news in a fast-paced, technology-driven world.

“These are the best of times in this information age where inquiring minds want to know everything right now — real-time news as it is happening. Information is readily available and instantly available,” Moore said. “These are also the worst of times because information is instantly available, but a lot of it is untrue.”

Moore said the term “fake news” is troubling because in her opinion it legitimizes what is not news, and leads to public distrust. Lindstrom spoke of the challenge of verifying information before it spreads like wildfire on the internet and the history of “fake news,” citing a reference to Nazi Germany.

“Fake news is not new in any sense. It is a long, historical pattern. It’s been used deliberately to incite people to do various things,” Lindstrom said. “What has changed in the aspect of fake news largely is the question of technology, which has driven the ability to spread untrue things far faster than anyone can get ahold of them and correct them.”

Lawler emphasized the process of reporting and how the way a journalist approaches a story makes a difference in their coverage.

“I think the best journalism that’s produced starts with an open-ended question and looks for an honest answer,” Lawler said.  “If you’re starting with an answer, you’re going about it the wrong way.”


Don LeDuc

WMU-Cooley President and Dean Don LeDuc presents opening remarks during the “Social Media: The Ethics of Fake News” panel discussion at WMU-Cooley Law School Lansing campus on March 22.

 Martha Moore, John Lindstrom, Emily Lawler

Panelists Martha Moore (left), John Lindstrom (center) and Emily Lawler (right) discuss “Social Media: The Ethics of Fake News” in an event hosted by WMU-Cooley Law School and the Michigan Capital Chapter, American Society for Public Administration on March 22.

About Western Michigan University Cooley Law School: WMU-Cooley Law School resulted from the 2014 affiliation that combined WMU's status as a nationally-ranked, public, comprehensive research university with the commitment to practical legal education of an independent, non-profit, national law school. WMU-Cooley is accredited by both the American Bar Association and the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The law school has provided nearly 20,000 graduates with the practical skills necessary for a seamless transition from academia to the real world, and enrolls classes in January, May, and September at its Lansing, Auburn Hills, and Grand Rapids, Michigan campuses, and its Tampa Bay, Florida campus. WMU and WMU-Cooley Law School operate as independent institutions with their own governance structure and separate fiduciary responsibilities.

 

Highlights

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